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Cartoons:
1930
1931
1932
1933
Characters:
Bosko & Honey
Foxy & Roxy
Piggy & Fluffy
Goopy Geer
Serving the Toon Community since August of 1998
Title Card "Bosko's Picture Show"
Looney Tunes (Bosko title #2)
Released: August 26, 1933
Length: 7:00
Starring: Bosko, Honey, Bruno

Credits:

Supervision by - Hugh Harman / Isadore Freleng
Drawn by - Isadore Freleng, Max Maxwell
Musical Score by - Frank Marsales


Summary:

Bosko runs a movie theater.

Description:

The deep sounds of "42nd Street" play over the title, which fades directly into a shot of the exterior of Bosko's movie theater. Inside, two curtains raise and a set of barn doors open with much fanfare, revealing the theater's screen. A card is projected that reads "Featuring Bosko at the console of the mighty Furtilizer organ". Bosko and the organ rise up out of a door in the floor, and Bosko greets the audience by shouting "Howdy, howdy, howdy folks! Let's sing!". He begins to play "We're in the Money", while the words appear on the screen so that the audience can sing along. At the conclusion of the song Bosko pulls on several of the organ's levers, each of which produces a sound effect (including one of a toilet flushing!). Next, a newsreel is projected onto the screen: "Out-Of-Tone News -- Sees All, Hears All, Smells All". The newsreel announcer introduces himself: "This is your talking reporter, Graham Cracker, announcing world events". The first story, from Geneva, Switzerland, is about a peace conference attended by world leaders. The film is of dozens of men beating the living daylights out of each other, with Graham Cracker providing a blow-by-blow account like a fight announcer. The next story, from Malibu, California, is about the Sunkist bathing beauties enjoying California sunshine. The film is of a snowstorm at the beach, with one bathing "beauty" coming precariously close to a tidal wave-like tide. Next, from Reno, Nevada, we read that boxer "Jack Dumpsey" is training for a comeback. The film is of a withered old man with a cane feebly hitting a punching bag. From Epsom Salts, England, comes film of the Blue-Blood Canines Race Classic. The footage is of a speeding pack of racing dogs, but lagging behind them is Bruno ("the champion"), who is leisurely sniffing the track. Bruno is startled and finally begins to run when he finds out what's behind him -- the four Marx Brothers equipped as dog catchers! Next, from Pretzel, Germany, a famous screen lover is on a European vacation. It's Jimmy Durante being chased by an axe-wielding Adolf Hitler, shouting "Am I mortified!". The newsreel comes to an end with a shot of a man cranking a meat grinder, and the words "It Squeaks for Itself". "This is only the beginning folks, only the beginning!" shouts Bosko, just before the next items appears on screen. It's a comedy short: Haurel and Lardy in "Spite of Everything". Haurel and Lardy are walking along and come across a pie cooling on a window sill. Lardy tells Haurel to steal it, but they can't decide which one of them should have it. After snatching it from each other numerous times, Haurel breaks the pie over Lardy's head, who then retaliates by whacking Haurel in the head with a pot. The film ends with Haurel in tears. Bosko shouts "Is everybody happy?!", and someone in the audience replies with a raspberry, but Bosko ignores it and presents the next film. A lion appears on the screen over the name "TNT Pictures". The lion roars a few times, then burps. The film is an 1890s melodrama entitled "He Done Her Dirt (and How!)". Honey is a sweet lass riding along on a bicycle, with the Marx Brothers following behind her and singing "Bicycle Built for Two". Bosko, providing the organ accompaniment to the film, looks at us and says "Ain't she sweet?". A title card appears that reads "Dirty Dalton (The Cur!)", and we watch as he and his bicycle creep along towards Honey. Bosko points to him on the screen and shouts "The dirty f--k!". Dirty Dalton hides behind a tree as Honey rides by, then snatches her off her bicycle and carries her away (via his own bicycle, which gallops like a horse). They leap off a cliff and onto a train passing underneath, but the car they land on breaks loose and goes off on a wild ride. Dalton struggles to hang on to the car, but when he spots Honey he shouts "Aha, me proud beauty!" and chases her. Honey is also trying her best to keep from being thrown off, and when she sees Dalton approaching she screams "Is there a boy scout in the audience?!". Bosko to jumps up and shouts "I'll save you!", then runs in front of the screen. He points to Dalton and shouts "Stop, you cur!", then leaps towards the picture. Instead of becoming part of the film, he goes right through the screen, ripping a big hole where Dalton's head was. Bosko's head pops out of the hole and he sees Honey applauding him. Bosko raises his arms in triumph, as his final adventure for Warner Bros. concludes.


Notes:

  • Obscure gags:
    --The "Furtilizer" organ refers to the famous Wurlitzer pipe organs featured in many theaters of that era.
    --"Out-of-Tone" news refers to Fox's Movietone News. It's slogans were "Sees all, Hears All, Knows All" and "It Speaks for Itself".
    --"Jack Dumpsey" refers to Jack Dempsey, the boxer who was heavyweight champion of the world for 7 straight years after World War I.
    --Buster Keaton successfully leaped into a movie screen in his 1924 film Sherlock, Jr. [LT&MM]
  • Bosko's line after the introduction of Dirty Dalton has been a subject of much dispute. According to LT&MM, Bosko says "The dirty fox!", yet on my uncut copy he clearly says "The dirty f--k!". Nickelodeon aired the cartoon with this line intact only once, then replaced it with a version in which Bosko says "The dirty cur!". If Bosko wasn't saying "f--k", then they wouldn't have had to replace that line. Since this is Harman & Ising's final cartoon for WB, it's possible that the line was included as a farewell message to Leon Schlesinger and WB. It's unlikely that the "f--k" version played in theaters; the "cur" version is what was probably seen by audiences in 1933.

Memorable Scenes:

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Video Availability:

None

 

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